News release

Associated links (A17Q0059)

Inadequate flight planning led to May 2017 collision with runway lights at Montreal/St-Hubert Airport, Quebec

Dorval, Quebec, 3 July 2018 – In its investigation report (A17Q0059) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) found that inadequate flight planning led to an aircraft colliding with runway lights after landing at the Montreal/St-Hubert Airport, Quebec.

On 15 May 2017, a U.S.-registered Bombardier Global Express aircraft was flying from Teterboro, New Jersey, to Montreal/St-Hubert Airport, Quebec, with three crew members and one passenger on board. The aircraft was cleared to land on Runway 06L at Montreal/St-Hubert Airport, which had been reduced in size to 75 feet wide and 5000 feet long due to construction work. At about 1055 local time, the aircraft touched down partially outside of the confines of the reduced-width runway, striking seven temporary runway edge lights. The pilot flying brought the aircraft back to the reduced-width runway centreline before coming to a stop 300 feet from the shortened runway end. There were no injuries but the aircraft sustained substantial damage.

The investigation found that the crew's flight planning did not adequately prepare them to ensure a safe landing. The flight crew believed that the entire width of the runway was available, despite notices to airmen (NOTAMs), communication with the air traffic controller and other information indicating the reduced runway size. Before landing, the flight crew misinterpreted the runway markings, and the pilot flying perceived the runway side stripe marking along the left edge of the runway as being the runway centreline. As a result, the aircraft touched down partly outside the limits of the available runway.

The approach briefing conducted by the flight crew did not include a review of the NOTAMs in effect at the airport, as required by the aircraft operator. This review could have made the crew aware of the reduced runway width prior to landing. If flight crews conduct incomplete approach briefings, there is a risk that information that is crucial for flight safety will be missed.

Following the occurrence, the operator of Montreal/St-Hubert Airport added a popup window to its website. It contained a message describing the construction work and specified that flight crews must read the notices to airmen in effect at the airport. Flight crews could also download a diagram of the construction work.


The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

For more information, contact:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Media Relations
Telephone: 819-994-8053
Email: media@tsb.gc.ca